Saturday, December 5, 2020

Daily Briefing

Something Doesn’t Check Out

New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell pitches voters on a ballot proposition she claims would fund an early childhood education program, but read the fine print.

Louisiana Potpourri For $400, Alex

What are 13th Ward Ramblings on Alex Trebek, Carnival 2021, Cedric Richmond, Karen Carter Peterson, and Jason Williams?

An Innovative School. An Inspiring Leader. And a Dangerously Stupid Line to Cross.

A former teacher at the high school inside New Orleans' jail can’t believe what he’s hearing.

In Baton Rouge, Steve Carter’s Wife Bankrolls the “Independent” PAC Supporting His Campaign for Mayor-President

Red Stick Forward isn't just playing fast and loose with the facts in its most recent commercial; the PAC may also be playing fast and loose with state law.

Kenna Moore’s Innovative Adaptation of “Anthology of Negro Poets” Rekindles the Lights of Live Theater

Le Petit Theatre's recent production of "An Anthology of Negro Poets" takes us on a narrative theatrical expedition, both supple and open-ended, which, as it progresses, becomes a dialectic getting at the relationships between metaphor, motion and movement-building as Black American history continues to be uncovered and freed from white nationalist mythologies

Opinion & Commentary

Louisiana Potpourri For $400, Alex

What are 13th Ward Ramblings on Alex Trebek, Carnival 2021, Cedric Richmond, Karen Carter Peterson, and Jason Williams?

An Innovative School. An Inspiring Leader. And a Dangerously Stupid Line to Cross.

A former teacher at the high school inside New Orleans' jail can’t believe what he’s hearing.

A Tale of Two Louisianas

A new study illustrates the geography of multigenerational poverty and systemic racism in Louisiana.

Nice Guys Don’t Always Finish Last

Peter Athas on the 2020 election, Steve Kornacki, baseball history, and why Joe Biden is like nice guy Mel Ott and Donald Trump is like Leo "The Lip" Durocher.

Criminal Justice

After Using “Unnecessary Force” Against an Unarmed Black Man, He Turned in His Badge. Now, He’s a Two-Term Congressman.

Clay Higgins rose to power by telling a story about personal redemption, but his former boss, the sheriff of St. Landry Parish, now claims he would have never given him a second chance in law enforcement if he'd known what really happened before Higgins resigned from the police force in Opelousas.

Grevy: The Life and Times of a Louisiana Iconoclast

Publisher's Note: What follows is an extraordinary portrait of Frances Carroll Grevemberg, the controversial lawman, war hero, and erstwhile gubernatorial...

U.S. Supreme Court Relegates Louisiana’s Split Jury Convictions to “the Dustbin of History”

State Attorney General Jeff Landry squandered a fortune defending a law that voters had already rejected and a majority conservative Supreme Court found to be racist.

CORRUPTION

As Trump Declares Emergency Over Coronavirus, Disgraced Former Louisiana DHH Secretary Shares the Stage

Only four years ago, Greenstein was reportedly struggling to find a job and staring at nine felony indictments related to his role in awarding a lucrative state Medicaid contract to a former employer.

The Return of Double Bill

Legislation to curb surprise medical billing appeared to be headed toward passage until private equity firms launched a dark money campaign in opposition, recruiting Sen. Bill Cassidy to rewrite the rules in their favor. Since then, executives at the firms have showered the Louisiana Republican with nearly $60,000 in campaign cash, while the proposal appears to be stuck in idle.

Too Much Is On The Ballot

13th Ward ramblings on the 2020 election, Orleans Parish style. Sidney Torres is NOT on the ballot; he just acts like he is.

Something Doesn’t Check Out

New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell pitches voters on a ballot proposition she claims would fund an early childhood education program, but read the fine print.

Louisiana Potpourri For $400, Alex

What are 13th Ward Ramblings on Alex Trebek, Carnival 2021, Cedric Richmond, Karen Carter Peterson, and Jason Williams?

An Innovative School. An Inspiring Leader. And a Dangerously Stupid Line to Cross.

A former teacher at the high school inside New Orleans' jail can’t believe what he’s hearing.

Lagniappe

Stories about Louisiana, the land and its people

Kenna Moore’s Innovative Adaptation of “Anthology of Negro Poets” Rekindles the Lights of Live Theater

Le Petit Theatre's recent production of "An Anthology of Negro Poets" takes us on a narrative theatrical expedition, both supple and open-ended, which, as it progresses, becomes a dialectic getting at the relationships between metaphor, motion and movement-building as Black American history continues to be uncovered and freed from white nationalist mythologies

Recommended Viewing: Best of the Fest, Part Two

You may not be able to count on Father Time being in your favor, but you can always count on the movies.

Recommended Viewing: ‘Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets’ at the 31st New Orleans Film Fest

'Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets' is the kind of film that has such a great sense of what feels reel and what is real. You almost could reach into the screen and grab a smoke, as it beats 3D every day of the week and then some.

Weekly Briefing

Something Doesn’t Check Out

New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell pitches voters on a ballot proposition she claims would fund an early childhood education program, but read the fine print.

In Baton Rouge, Steve Carter’s Wife Bankrolls the “Independent” PAC Supporting His Campaign for Mayor-President

Red Stick Forward isn't just playing fast and loose with the facts in its most recent commercial; the PAC may also be playing fast and loose with state law.

Theater of the Absurd: How A Louisiana Extremist Helped the Trump Campaign Manufacture Outrage

Months before Tuesday's election, a controversial GOP operative with ties to Baton Rouge began planning a series of voter fraud protests across the nation.

Exclusive: Internal Memo Circulated by LA GOP’s Sharon Hewitt Outlines Effort to Undermine Emergency Covid-19 Orders

Memo advises GOP legislators to buck Trump White House guidelines and ignore the advice and recommendations of public health experts.

An Innovative School. An Inspiring Leader. And a Dangerously Stupid Line to Cross.

A former teacher at the high school inside New Orleans' jail can’t believe what he’s hearing.

History

This Never-Before-Seen Scrapbook Chronicles the News of the Kingfish’s Death

New Orleans printmaker Jane Barnard Bland preserved this scrapbook her father made after Huey P. Long died. 85 years later, we're publishing it online.

The Bayou Brief's Compendium on Race, Power, and Louisiana History.

Note: This will be periodically updated. Preface During the past three years, we have featured dozens...

Grevy: The Life and Times of a Louisiana Iconoclast

Publisher's Note: What follows is an extraordinary portrait of Frances Carroll Grevemberg, the controversial lawman,...

Before the Cajun Navy, A Ragtag Group of Civilian Boaters Fought Nazi Germany Off the Louisiana Coast

The incredible, true story of when the Louisiana Gulf Coast was on the frontlines of World War II.

How Ya Like Dat?

The American Saga of Carlos Marcello

The final chapter of the Bayou Brief's "Godfather Trilogy" about the life of Carlos Marcello turned into a book, and for the first time ever, members of Marcello's tightly-knit family, including his son Joe, are sharing their side of a remarkable story.

Our Disappearing Coast

A Trio of Trump Appointees Give Louisiana a Game-Changing Victory in Coastal Damages Suit Against Big Oil

In a terse, five-page opinion, a three-judge panel of the US Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit reject Big Oil's last ditch effort at avoiding accountability in state court.

As a Divided Committee Advances Bill to Neuter Coastal Lawsuits Against Big Oil, a GOP Legislator Urges the Public to “Raise Hell”

After eight years of legal wrangling, as six coastal parishes stand on the brink of unlocking billions to repair the environmental damages allegedly caused by illegal and largely unpermitted activities of Big Oil, the state legislature considers a bill that would strike down the lawsuits and throw out a breakthrough $100 million settlement already negotiated with one of the companies involved.

Baring the Facts on the Dresser Mess

“There is no ‘safe’ dose of a carcinogen.” – Rachel Carson, "Silent Spring"

Mayor Jeff Hall Dispatches Cleco’s Former Top Lawyer to Secret Meeting with NextGEN

Invoices exclusively obtained by the Bayou Brief reveal that the Alexandria Mayor’s Office has been assembling a plan to privatize the city’s nonprofit utility system for more than seven months, despite what they’ve claimed publicly.

The Socials

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Civil Rights

A Tale of Two Louisianas

A new study illustrates the geography of multigenerational poverty and systemic racism in Louisiana.

After a Supporter Predicts “New American Civil War” and Criticizes Anti-Racism Education, U.S. Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith Raves, “That Was Wonderful. I Just Want to...

The comments were made by a 31-year-old Tampa man who previously worked for a company that scammed and scared conservatives by selling fake news and fake cures. According to Hyde-Smith's campaign, she was responding to "several minutes of comments he made about his personal story." Earlier today, the video quickly disappeared online, but not before we downloaded a copy. Let's review the tape.

Doxxieland: Unmasking the Racist Resistance

As the COVID pandemic continues its devastation in Louisiana, a pair of conservative talk radio hosts spearhead a campaign that purports to be about opposing government-imposed restrictions but appears to be a proxy for defenders of the Lost Cause.

After Using “Unnecessary Force” Against an Unarmed Black Man, He Turned in His Badge. Now, He’s a Two-Term Congressman.

Clay Higgins rose to power by telling a story about personal redemption, but his former boss, the sheriff of St. Landry Parish, now claims he would have never given him a second chance in law enforcement if he'd known what really happened before Higgins resigned from the police force in Opelousas.

CenLa Exclusives

In Louisiana’s Fifth District, GOP Candidates Pledge to Fight Socialism While Subsidizing Farmers

In a crowded race for an open seat, unless Democratic voters consolidate around one candidate, it appears as if we may be headed toward a runoff between two Republicans.

Baring the Facts on the Dresser Mess

“There is no ‘safe’ dose of a carcinogen.” – Rachel Carson, "Silent Spring"

Mayor Jeff Hall Dispatches Cleco’s Former Top Lawyer to Secret Meeting with NextGEN

Invoices exclusively obtained by the Bayou Brief reveal that the Alexandria Mayor’s Office has been assembling a plan to privatize the city’s nonprofit utility system for more than seven months, despite what they’ve claimed publicly.

In for a Shock

In response to reports that Alexandria is contemplating privatizing its 126-year-old, nonprofit municipal utility system, some have claimed they’re paying too much, but anyone who believes a private operator will make things cheaper is in for a shock.

Best of the BriefSince 2017
We share the stories of Louisiana

“Combat in the Courtroom” Episode One: The Murder Trial of Aaron Mintz

In what was the most sensational case in New Orleans in thirty years and the first-ever trial to earn wall-to-wall coverage on local television news, Mike Fawer became an overnight celebrity and the city’s most sought-after criminal defense attorney as he represented a prominent furniture dealer charged with murdering his wife.

The Bayou Brief's Compendium on Race, Power, and Louisiana History.

Note: This will be periodically updated. Preface During the past three...

The Beginning of Hell

"I don't know how I got to safety after the riot," a black trainee at Camp Claiborne recalled. "I only know one thing and that is, whenever anybody says, 'Remember Pearl Harbor,' I will say, 'I will remember Lee Street.'"